6 Reasons why patriarchy stole Friday the 13th from Women and made it evil

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Friday the 13th

If you are on Twitter, then you already have some fear of the bad luck you are likely to encounter today being Friday the 13th. This day without a doubt freaks out a lot of people and it is all because of the patriarchy.

Did you know that before Friday the 13th became associated with bad luck and horror, it used to be considered a powerful day for celebrating feminine energy?

Patriarchal religions have twisted both Friday and the number 13 to carry negative connotations. Among the myths associated with the number 13 is that someone dies within a year after eating at a table with 12 other people. This stems from the Biblical Last Supper.

1. Only Day of the Week Named after a Woman

However, it’s time for Friday the 13th to stop being considered unlucky. Friday is the only day in the week named after a woman – Freyja. The Anglo Saxon goddess of fecundity shares the rest of the working week with a veritable sausage fest of gods: Thor, Woden and Tyr.

2. Day of the Goddess

But before Christianity came along, Friday the 13th was a very powerful day for feminine energy and creativity. Before patriarchal times, Friday the 13th was considered the day of the Goddess. It was considered a day to worship the Divine Feminine that lives in us all and to honor the cycles of creation and death and rebirth.

3. Average number of Menstrual Cycles in a Year

Friday the 13th was considered a very powerful day for the women. A day to manifest, honor creativity and to celebrate beauty, wisdom and nourishment of the soul. Thirteen is a female number, representing the average number of a woman’s cycle in a year. It is also the number, too, of annual cycles of the moon—viewed by earth-based religions as ‘female.’

4. Friday is Venus Day

Friday is Venus Day and we all know that Venus is the epitome of feminine energy. Her energy joins us at the end of the week to honour the days gone by and to remind us that it is important to rest, relax and play. We all look forward to Friday, and we all naturally find ourselves unwinding and relaxing in her comforting energy. Friday is the perfect day to embrace Venus like energy and to focus on creativity, beauty and sensuality.

5. Divine Magical Powers during Ovulation

Before patriarchal times, when a woman was bleeding she was considered to embody divine and magical powers. She was regarded by all for her wisdom and ability to offer intuitive and psychic messages. When she was ovulating, she was considered to be at the height of her power. She was celebrated for her ability to receive, hold and create new life. It was only when society became more patriarchal that women were made to feel shamed when they were having their periods. The patriarchal society started ignoring women’s amazing potential to create and hold space for new life. This attitude has helped to contribute to the idea that Friday the 13th is an unlucky day.

6. Break the Misogynistic Tendencies on Friday the 13th

If we can replace fear with feminine celebration, we might just be able to break misogynistic unease. The unease that sees a group of 13 women as a potential meeting of witches; that is reluctant to allow women on board boats; that bans women from the kitchen during their period; that throws the word curse over its shoulder like salt in Satan’s eye.

Instead of cowering in your closet in fear of what today may bring, we need to celebrate Venus. We need to celebrate the goddess of love, and all the good energy Friday the 13th can offer. Let us all wear pink—it could be pink underwear—buy pink flowers, light a pink candle, drink rose petal tea, or carry rose quartz.

Something good will happen to you on this Friday the 13th. On this day with Goddess’ energies doubled, consider the lucky blend of just the right conditions, chemistries, elements, and energies, and work your own magic.

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About Nyawara Osodo33 Articles
A girl next door. Student fascinated by human interest stories. Writing is my way of understanding life

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