POWER WOMEN: Beatrice Watare – the 20-year-old rising star at KUTV

Just at 20 years, Beatrice Watare is regarded as a role model to many a campus lady.

She host a breakfast show on Kenyatta University-based television station KU TV and if anything, her mastery of Swahili language is admirable.

In this week’s POWER WOMEN WEDNESDAY feature, we had a chat with the sassy KU TV presenter Beatrice Watare to find out what makes her tick.

TCLM: Who is Beatrice Watare and what does success mean to her?

Well, I am 20 years of age, which many find hard to believe. I am a show host, anchor, producer and content developer at KUTV.

I also write poems both Swahili and English and do relationship advice YouTube videos. Aside from that I’m also a voice over artist and an author of kids’ books.

I’d say I am a young, talented and ambitious lady who is passionate about every single thing she does.

TCLM: How do you push through your worst times?

I get down on my knees and pray. I believe it’s the one thing that gives me all the satisfaction I need. It always feels like I’ve just let someone take charge and all I have to do is believe and have faith.

TCLM: How has your experience working at KU TV been?

I don’t know where to even begin, but it’s just been a whole package. On to the good, bad, complicated, disappointing and even at times overwhelming. But I have grown so much, having worked there after I turned 18 years old.

It was almost like trying to strike a balance between being a teenager and also a very responsible adult. However, I always had people around me to help me through it all, like my former co-host Milliah Tabitha who took me in and nurtured me. I still miss her a lot.

Beatrice WatareTCLM: What are your success habits

Ive always believed in making sure I give each day 100% of everything I do. I always believe in having something done for the very first time and killing it anyway. This kind of attitude has made me be one person who does so much with every bit of her talent. I don’t believe in giving up because to me success is 99% failure.

TCLM: How do you strike a balance between personal and life in the public eye?

I think that’s the most difficult bit when it comes to public figures, and everyone handles it differently. There’s a lot of expectations out there of how I should live my life. Some think I should always be on fleek, expensive clothes, a car even, but I think the key thing is to be yourself and not go overboard just to impress people out there. The world will accept you for who you are, if you are brave to show it, who you really are.

TCLM: What was your dream job as a kid? Why?

I always wanted to be a journalist and it’s because I so much admired people on TV. But the very thing that made me so ambitious is the fact that my mum wouldn’t allow me watch TV most of the times. So, I would tease her saying she will one day see me there, but after I lock my bedroom door to avoid having the beating of my life.

TCLM: If you were a president for one day, what would you do for the girl-child in Kenya?

Quite a big question but I think all id do is to empower them because the moment you do that, you instill the right attitude, and with the right attitude, they can conquer the world. I wouldn’t help them escape the fights, discrimination and bad treatment, but rather give them the strength and willpower to do it themselves.

TCLM: What woman inspires you? Why?

My mother always inspires me, quite cliché but my mom always believed in me. From day one. She always told me that I could do anything I ever wanted, as long as I put God first. Anytime I’m facing a challenge, she always reminds me that in order for God to bless me He must make my story big enough. She is my rock.

TCLM: What is the biggest challenge for the generation of women in which you belong? Why?

The biggest challenge we face is ourselves actually. I’ll give a brief scenario. You can take a dog out of a cage so that it escapes, but instead it stays right there. Why? Because the cage is not out of the dog. So as women we have all It takes to come out stronger but because of the belief in us that women are less privileged, we end up not living to our full potential.

TCLM: What is the best and worst decisions you have ever made?

It’s quite a number but I think if there’s one decision I’ve ever made that totally changed my life, is to pursue my dreams, no matter what.

Another is when I decided not to take leakage, back in high school during the national examinations. The grade I got was low but that made my mum work day in day out to secure a media course for me before the regular September intake.

I got to Kenyatta university in May 2016 and it was during that same time when I was picked to work at KUTV, during a Safaricom sponsored talent event before I even started classes. The event has never happened again.

The worst decision I ever made was letting other people’s opinions get to me. I’m wiser now and I believe life is a learning process

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