Simple tips to help you deal with acne

How to deal with acne

Teenage years are challenging times for many young ladies even under the best of circumstances. But if the face you present to the world is marred by prominent lesions of acne, the ordinary emotional and social stresses of adolescence can be that much more difficult to weather.

The psychological effects of acne can be profound, and persons with acne are at risk for substantial, negative effects on quality of life. Acne affects how an individual feels about themselves and can increase their risk of depression, anxiety and social isolation. Add the stress of campus life to that and any campus lady will be down and out.

Acne is very visible — the face is the first thing people see. It’s not something a campus lady can easily hide. However, we have several ways in which you can deal with the acne menace on campus:

Keep your face clean

Whether or not you have acne, it’s important to wash your face twice daily to remove impurities, dead skin cells, and extra oil from your skin’s surface. Washing more often than twice daily is not necessarily better; it may do more harm than good. Use warm, not hot, water and a mild facial cleanser. Using a harsh soap (like deodorant body soap) can hurt already inflamed skin and cause more irritation.

Avoid scrubbing your skin harshly with a washcloth, an exfoliating glove, or loofah (a coarse-textured sponge). Gently wash it with a very soft cloth or your hands. Always rinse well, and then dry your face with a clean towel. (Toss the towel in the laundry hamper, as dirty towels spread bacteria.) Also, use the washcloth only once.

Use makeup sparingly

During a breakout, avoid wearing foundation, powder, or blush. If you do wear makeup, wash it off at the end of the day. If possible, choose oil-free cosmetics without added dyes and chemicals. Choose makeup that is labeled as “noncomedogenic,” meaning it should not cause acne. Read the ingredients list on the product label before buying.

Keep your hands off your face

People know not to do this but some may not even realize they’re doing it. If you sit in front of a computer most hours of your work days, try putting a post-it note on the side of your screen saying “Do not touch face!”

Avoid touching your face or propping your cheek or chin on your hands. Not only can you spread bacteria, you can also irritate the already inflamed facial skin. Never pick or pop pimples with your fingers, as it can lead to infection and scarring.

Feed your skin

Most experts agree that certain foods, like chocolate, don’t cause pimples. Still, it makes sense to avoid greasy food and junk food and add more fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains to your diet. Dairy products and foods high in processed sugar may trigger acne. Avoid these.

Add turmeric to your diet because it has anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antiseptic properties that may reduce redness and inflammation of acne. It’s a good reason to order Indian food the next time you go out, or try adding this spice to your eggs or stir-fry at home, she says.

Avoid getting yourself stressed

Some studies link stress with the severity of pimples or acne. Ask yourself what’s making you feel stressed. Then look for solutions.

When in doubt, check with a dermatologist to see if you need more treatment to prevent or stop acne.

About Nyawara Osodo30 Articles
A girl next door. Student fascinated by human interest stories. Writing is my way of understanding life

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